The Dr. Vibe Show

We would like to apologize for the poor audio quality at times during this conversation.

D’Juan Hopewell is a career advocate for oppressed people. His work has been instrumental in passing major legislation in the Maryland General Assembly, including marriage equality, the Dream Act and retirement security. His anti-hunger work resulted in an unprecedented funding increase from the legislature toward school breakfast programs for children. D’Juan currently runs a blog, HopewellThought.com and contributes for the HuffPost and Blavity.com. His current focus as an entrepreneur is creating jobs on the South Side of Chicago.

Mr. Hopewell was our on our show talking about his article How Could We Have So Much Hate For Umar, But Love R. Kelly?.

During our conversation, Mr. Hopewell talked about:

– Some of his background including life growing up as a preacher’s kid, how he hated school
– Dropping out of university and being unemployed for three years
– Why did he write the article
– His belief that many men are unconsciously sexist and the root causes for this
– Why the world is unsafe for Black women and who is responsible for this situation
– Why he hasn’t spoken about this issue with Black men
– His thoughts on the current state of relationships with Black women and Black men
– Reaction to the article
– His call to action for Black men and Black women

You can connect with Mr. Hopewell via:

Website
Twitter
Facebook
Instagram

Visit our website at https://www.thedrvibeshow.com/

Please feel free to email us at dr.vibe@thedrvibeshow.com

God bless, peace, be well and keep the faith, 

Dr. Vibe 

 


Victor A. Kwansa, Esq. is an attorney, education advocate, poet, and essayist from Prince George’s County, Maryland. He received a B.A. in Political Science from Yale University in 2008, and he graduated from Harvard Law School in 2011. His essays have been featured in Blavity and a Yale booklet for incoming freshmen. While at Yale, Victor co-founded WORD, a performance poetry group. His poetry has been featured in Essence magazine, CURA: A Literary Magazine of Art and Action, and Yale’s student publication, Sphere. In 2010, he was featured in The Root‘s online gallery of up-and-coming artists and entrepreneurs. He has spoken and/or performed at universities, K-12 schools, community centers, and even once while visiting a former slave camp in Ghana, his parents’ home country. His website features his poetry and essays regarding social justice issues and black historical figures.

Mr. Kwansa was on our show talking about his article How The Black Panther Movie Can Impact The Children Of The Black Lives Matter Movement.

During our conversation, Mr. Kwansa talked about:

– Some of his background including being raised by parents from Ghana and the values that his parent instilled in him
– Why did he pursue law as a profession
– How social justice and poetry become part of his life
– The background behind the article
– His thoughts on #BlackLivesMatter and his concerns when it comes to Black youth and their future
– The relationship between the Black Panther movie and African society and how the Black Panther movie can help all Blacks
– The reaction to the article and what would he like the impact of his article to be
– His memories of visiting Ghana
– What does he feel is the future of the #BlackLivesMatter movement
– What is up next for him

You can contact Mr. Kwanza via:

Website
Twitter

Visit our website at https://www.thedrvibeshow.com/

Please feel free to email us at dr.vibe@thedrvibeshow.com

God bless, peace, be well and keep the faith, 

Dr. Vibe 

 


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